Christians Engaged in Faith Formation

Forming Faith: The Blog of Christians Engaged in Faith Formation

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  • 01 Mar 2019 10:23 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Ellen Wehn is the Director of Children's Ministry at First United Methodist Church Owasso in Owasso, Oklahoma. Ellen also has experience in church daycare and week day preschool ministries.

    Easter is a time when churches prepare for visitors. Of course we want all of our visitors to feel welcome. We make sure there are volunteers in the parking lot to help with parking, as well as volunteers inside - available to give directions to classes. Easter Lilies line the altar in keeping with the occasion.

    But what about one of the most important areas for young families visiting your church?

    The nursery is one of the most important rooms in the church. It can mean the difference in a family making the decision of returning to your church after Easter. This area of the church should always be a warm environment for these young families. If the nursery doesn’t feel welcoming - and most importantly - safe, it won’t matter how many volunteers you have helping with parking and giving directions or how many Easter Lilies are lining the altar. Those families won’t be back.

    Here are some tips to help you get your nursery ready to greet Easter visitors.

    • TOYS: The church nursery seems to be the place people bring toys that their children have outgrown. Unfortunately, some of those old toys can make the nursery look like a forgotten area. Take some time before Easter to inspect all the toys. Get rid of old and broken toys, and toys that look dirty.
    • SAFETY: A major concern for all parents is safety. Are all your nursery workers and volunteers background-checked and CPR certified? Is your nursery there some kind of boundary to limit only people with background checks into the nursery? These things help parents feel secure about leaving their child with you. Don’t be afraid to post a sign letting everyone know about your safety procedures and background checks.
    • HAZARDS: Look around for any safety hazards. For example – If you have no door to a restroom in the nursery, be sure there is a baby gates to keep a toddler from going into a bathroom. Dangerous items need elevated beyond the reach of babies. Electrical outlets should be covered. Check for rips in the changing pad. These are things that visiting parents will see.
    • A CALM SPACE: This might be a good time to update the look of your nursery by giving it a fresh coat of paint. Remember, the child is separating from their mother, you want this to be a very calm area. Avoid a bright color on the wall with bold designs or huge murals.  You want to choose a very soft color. Gray is very popular right now and very calm. You can always add a few areas of color in the room to give it some pop, but be sure to emphasize a calm feeling.


    • DECORATING THE NURSERY: A great way to decorate your nursery is with pictures of your happy babies in your nursery. One of my favorite pictures we have hanging in the nursery is a 6 month old child playing with one of our pastors.


    • HOSPITALITY ROOM: Some parents are not comfortable leaving their child in the nursery. Is there a room you can have available for mothers to nurse, change diapers, or just calm a fussy child? Even better, stream the worship service into the room.
    • FINAL TOUCHES: Ensure the nursery smells nice! Use an appropriate, safe device that can emit nice scents (the scent needs to be mild and not over powering). Some soft music playing helps with a relaxing drop off time.
    • GOING HOME: Be sure to provide the parents a report they can take with them of how many times the child was changed, as well as bottles or snacks they have had. Include a few details about activities to show the visiting parents that their children are kept active whenever possible.
  • 22 Feb 2019 6:30 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Sarah Gregory is the Communications Coordinator for CEF. Sarah has a MACE from Garrett-Evangelical Seminary. She writes as a freelance writer for Deep Blue Rotations and has worked in local churches as a Director of Discipleship, Worship Leader, and Nursing Home Chaplain.


    Finding the right resources for Lent and Easter for your community can be challenging. I have highlighted five that I think work well for bridging age gaps and uniting the entire congregation. What resources are you using?


    #Picturelent is a free online resource. It is a joint project between Rio Texas and Michigan Annual conference with sponsorship by Deep Blue Connect and Sparkhouse Publishing House. #Picturelent is a daily online devotional and picture challenge for social media users. Each devotional encourages action and questions, making the resource flexible for small groups, personal devotions, and online communities. (Full disclosure, I wrote the entry for April 17th this year.) 

    Illustrated Children’s Ministry Lenten Coloring Projects are not just for kids. Entire churches can gather to bring color and life to the vibrant and modern coloring sheets. When I was a Director of Discipleship, I used the coloring sheets with small groups of all ages, then posted the finished work throughout the church at Easter to bring a little color to the sanctuary and hallways. 

    Celebrate a Deep Blue Family Easter Books--These affordable Easter booklets feature the Deep Blue Kids on an egg hunt. The story features the symbol of the Easter Egg and helps children understand the story of Easter. New this year to the Easter Books, families will find discussion questions inside to guide the whole family through the story together. If your church does an Easter Egg hunt, consider getting these books as a way to tie together your joyful celebration and the Easter story. 

    Free Lenten Coloring Calendar by Kathy Wadsley have been featured on our website before and for good reason. The Calendars correspond to the Lenten readings and guide users through scriptures for their Lenten practices. You can find the coloring calendars in English of Spanish.

    The CEF Lent Resources Blog Post- These resources posted in 2018 still offer incredible insight guidance and ideas. Consider Lent in a bag, Lenten picture books, holy week activities, or intergenerational lent events. 

    Bonus resources:

    Want to know more about Lenten theology and practice? Check out these great resources.

    Lent Worship Planning by Discipleship Ministries

    Lent 101 by Upper Room

    Ash Wednesday for Kids by Discipleship Ministries


  • 21 Feb 2019 7:11 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Rev. Kathy Wadsley is a former CEF Board Member. She served most recently at St. Matthews UMC in Bowie, MD. We are thankful for this resource she has freely shared. If you would like to make a donation in her honor to continue to support CEF's efforts to make member-created resources like these available, please use the donate tab on this website.

    This three-year series of devotional calendars is available in both Englishand Spanish for both Lent and Advent. Great for all ages and families of all sizes. May be printed at home, or inserted into church newsletters or emails. Each day includes a suggested activity a symbol to color.

    Lenten Calendar Year C (English)

    Intro and Printing Instruction

    Calendario de Cuaresma Ano C (Spanish)

    Adviento y Cuaresma Calendarios Devocionales en Inglés y en Español - Intro e Imprimir

    These calendars are part of an ecumenical three-year series of Advent – Christmas and Lenten calendars based on the new common lectionary scriptures. The calendars, available in English and Spanish, are designed to encourage families and individuals to take a few moments each day to focus on the meaning of these special seasons of the church year. Each day of Advent through Epiphany or each day of Lent though Easter Sunday has a scripture reference from the new common lectionary or a related activity and a symbol which children of all ages may enjoy coloring. 

    Suggestions for use: 

    † For Families at home. 

    † Use in Sunday School as a class or weekday ministries to learn about the seasons and the symbols. 

    † Classes could draw their own symbols, write the meaning on it and make a large calendar on classroom wall or bulletin board. 

    † Color symbols with magic markers or colored pencils. 

    † Use as daily family or individual devotional. 

    †Distribute at Worship or Sunday School, in church newsletter or other ways. 

    Printing Instructions: The Lenten Coloring Calendars are designed to be printed on legal (8.5” X 11”) paper and can be printed on ledger (11” X 17”) paper for larger print. The calendars are designed to be printed with calendar front on one side and calendar back on the other side using one sheet of paper. 

    Copyright These copyrighted calendars are designed by Kathryn (Kathy) L. Wadsley, Minister of Christian Education, The United Methodist Church. Churches have permission to copy and distribute the calendars for use. Calendars may only be freely given as a spiritual formation tool and may not be sold.


  • 25 Jan 2019 1:30 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Dr. Jack Seymour is a Professor Emeritus at Garrett-Evangelical Theological seminary. He co-chairs the editorial committee of Horizons in Religious Education, the book series of the Religious Education Association (REA). Contact him at jack.seymour@garrett.edu.

    Margaret Ann Crain holds the distinction of Professor Emeritus at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary.  She is an ordained deacon in the United Methodist Church and author of The United Methodist Deacon: Ordained to word, service, compassion, and justice. Contact her at margaretann.crain@garrett.edu.


    Scholarship in Christian Religious Education is alive and well.  The following important books written by a diverse set of authors, all Christian religious educators, focus on teaching the people of God for hope and transformation.  Promoting “abundant living” promised in the gospel is their commanding vision.  They are all grounded in actual experiences and communities. Of course, some are difficult, primarily because their content addresses the violence, racism, and division of our time, but they tell us the truth. They offer direction and insights for how Christian education impacts our world.  Reading them enriches vision and empowers ministry.  They will make a difference!

    We would be happy to be in touch with any of you about the ideas and practices in these books.  We suggest starting some small groups in your local areas to read them together and to glean directions for our work as church educators, youth ministers, children’s workers, and teachers. 


    Elizabeth Caldwell.  Engaging a Child’s Curiosity about the Bible. Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press, 2016.

    How do we support children and parents as they read the Bible and interpret its meanings?  After a review of several Bible story books, Elizabeth Caldwell offers an effective method (“I wonder”) of joining in conversation with families and children. Upon completing this book, she and Carol Wehrheim edited a wonderful Bible story book, Growing in God's Love: A Story Bible (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox, 2018), to help parents, teachers and children experience the witness of the Bible.

    Leah Gunning Francis.  Ferguson and Faith: Sparking Leadership & Awakening Community.  St. Louis, MO: Chalice Press, 2015.

    Through this rich narrative, we meet the people of God in Ferguson, Missouri as they respond to the shooting death of Michael Brown.  Leah Gunning Francis spoke with those who lived and worked in Ferguson – church and community leaders who responded to racism and violence.  She introduces us to effective practices of leadership and action that make a difference, offer hope,  and educate communities.

    Courtney T. Goto, 2016. The Grace of Playing: Pedagogies for Leaning into God’s New Creation. Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications, 2016. 

    Connecting devotional practices, art, meditation, and teaching, Courtney Goto invites us to experience the “grace” of teaching.  Our vocation as people of God is to respond to God’s invitation in the everyday real moments of our lives.  She provides directions on how we teach, play, and learn so that we can “lean” into God’s emerging creation?

    Thomas H. Groome. Will There Be Faith: A New Vision for Educating and Growing Disciples. New York: Harper Collins, 2011.

    Tom Groome asks how faith will last into the future?  He responds calling us to teach a living and vital faith. He describes the ways congregations and schools organize their ministries to touch the deepest realities of people’s lives, including a concrete method for teaching.  For Tom, we join in vital villages of faith and partner in God’s vision enlivening our world with hope and justice.

    Charles R. Foster.  From Generation to Generation: The Adaptive Challenge of Mainline Protestant Education in Forming Faith.  Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2012. 

    Exploring past decisions that limited the scope and impact of Christian religious education, Chuck Foster offers directions about how to engage the whole congregation as a setting for learning.  He calls us to teach the fullness of faith.  Practices of hospitality, celebration, and conversation are enlivened as profound moments of teaching and learning.

    Sheryl A. Kujawa-Holbrook. God Beyond Borders: Interreligious Learning among Faith Communities.  Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications, 2014

    Sheryl Kujawa-Holbrook introduces us to many projects in interfaith dialogue, community-building, and action.  We see concrete efforts that assist us to cross differences, to understand each other, and to work together for the common good.  She shows us how to engage in interfaith learning. 

    Emily A. Peck-McClain. Arm in Arm with Adolescent Girls: Educating into the New Creation. Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications, 2018. 

    We hear the stories of several young women from diverse cultures as they seek to live day to day.  Emily Peck-McClain invites us to see their struggles and their hopes as they confront forces that seek to limit and silence them.  In the letters of the apostle Paul, she finds resources for enlivening faith, offering practices for living, and building healthy and faithful futures.

    Patrick Reyes.  Nobody Cries When We Die: God, Community and Surviving to Adulthood.  St. Louis. MO: Chalice Press, 2016.

    One of the most powerful and prophetic books on this list.  Patrick Reyes exposes us to the violent realities in which he and many others grow up.  We meet mentors that offer hope and new life.  He shows how many of our patterns of Christian education tame the gospel and avoid the most important realities of living together.  He calls Christian education to focus on survival and abundant living – on how God “calls us to life in the midst of violence and pain (p. 169).”

    Jack L Seymour.  Teaching the Way of Jesus: Educating Christians for Faithful Living.  Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press, 2014.

    Grounded in biblical study, Jack Seymour invites us to rethink Christian religious education as teaching and living the Way of Jesus.  Community-building and prayer, teaching, and mission all become pathways of learning.  Like the disciples of the first generation who sought to embody Jesus’ practices of healing and new life, we are concretely invited to know the Way of Jesus so we can teach and live the Way of Jesus. 

    Mai-Anh Le Tran. Reset the Heart: Unlearning Violence, Relearning Hope.  Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press, 2017.

    How does Christian faith address the violence of our world – the violence of racism, class segregation, and bullying?  Mai-Anh Le Tran offers us actual practices and case studies of Christian religious education that empower us to communicate and learn as we seek redemption, hope, and new life.

    Katherine Turpin & Anne Carter Walker. Nurturing Different Dreams: Youth Ministry across Lines of Difference. Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications, 2014.

    Using experiences and case studies, Katherine Turpin and Anne Carter Walker offer options for youth ministries in churches and schools.  In an increasingly diverse world where youth encounter each other daily as well as the realities of social stratification and separation, we need their suggestions and practices for teaching across differences and promoting mutual learning.

    Almeda Wright.  The Spiritual Lives of Young African Americans. New York City, NY: Oxford University Press, 2016.

    Through extensive study with young African American Christians, Almeda Wright reveals the realities of racism and violence that they face daily.  She provides concrete practices of youth ministry, practices of spirituality and transformation that help us offer and choose life – abundant living.


  • 21 Jan 2019 11:00 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Rev. Dr. Brenda Buckwell is founder of Living Streams Flowing Water spiritual formation ministry.  As an ordained elder she preaches, consults with congregations, districts and judicatories integrating spiritual formation into the mainstream of ministry. She teaches prayer and spiritual direction at Ashland Theological Seminary, Garrett Evangelical Seminary and CenterQuest. You may reach Brenda through the contact form on her website www.livingstreamsflowingwater.com

    Is intergenerational spiritual formation possible in the 21st century?

    Remember the phrase “It takes a village to raise a child?” Has the notion of village become lost in our contemporary culture? When I look around, I see individuals struggling.  People pour out large amounts of energy striving to make ends meet while keeping stability in the household and completing daily to do lists. Individualism looms as a dominant pattern for obtaining job satisfaction, self-worth, and bolstering a sense of accomplishment and knowledge through crowd-sourcing posted on social media. Often this preferred stance of the “self-made” person drives our personal seeking for God overlooking generational wisdom.

    Intergenerational faith formation has the potential to gift an individualized nation that is divided among race, socio-economic and political lines by creating villages. “Revillaging” community creates opportunity for spiritual kinship to thrive through creativity, storytelling and mentoring. This leads to an incarnational embodied faith that is easily shared between generations and through stages of development.

    Seeing Beyond the Surface: Contemplative listening and receiving

    The foundation to faith-revillaging for community is seeing beyond the surface. This is looking beyond the specifics of age, race, gender and classism to the heart of creation. With expectant hope and certainty that God is dwelling in the other, each age level can experience God’s presence in the other as spiritual kinship is birthed.  The trick is to develop eyes to see and ears to hear God’s presence and voice in the other.  The best method of training for this contemplative gazing is spiritual direction. 

    This contemplative mode of listening and receiving the other in spiritual direction is an historic prayer practice which binds people together at a soul deep level and transforms the outward actions of mission, service and prayer. This mid-wifery process of spiritual direction brings new understandings, experiences and wisdom of God to humanity creating a plethora of intergenerational opportunities for faith forming practices in the village of God’s people.

    Story Telling

    People of all ages can engage in the storytelling.  This is much more than just retelling the biblical story.  Holy listening and storytelling with an intergenerational village provides opportunity for persons to share how God is present, active and transforming life personally. Envision a Grandma (a spiritual mother) surrounded by adults, children, and teens telling her weekly experience of God’s abounding grace. Then Grandma invites another individual forward and the child shares. 

    But the question arises, what if one does not know their own story? Creative arts prayers can assist in eliciting one’s story of faith.

    Creative Arts Prayer

    Creative arts prayer techniques provide great fodder for revillaging a community as generations intermix.  Visio Divina with cartoons, movie clips and pictures or icons can open the way for insightful story conversation.   The benefit of praying in color literally opens a space within the brain for the presence of God to rise to the consciousness of younger and older individuals.  Great joy can be experienced by picking up colored pencils and allowing the beyond words expression of God to fill the sacred circle of a Mandala as community explores the Alpha and Omega of Christ. Meditative Movement with prayer postures, hand dancing and the use of breath with the infilling of the Holy Spirit breaks down the age division among us. With these and more creative arts prayers, we can witness to nonverbal expressions of God’s presence and stand in solidarity with those that are suffering and growing in grace.

    Spiritual Mentors

    Intentional storytelling gives rise to the need of spiritual mentors.  Since spiritual formation is a life-long journey,  through which children, teens, young adults, middle adults and older adults travel. Every age and stage of life can become mentors for others, as well as relate to a mentor in faith for ourselves.

    It takes a village to encourage one another in faith. The multigenerational opportunity of co-creating with God spiritual kinships across cultural divides is limitless. How will you begin? With whom will you share your faith story?  How can you encourage others to break the fear of “professional artist” into accessible movement and praying in color?  I look forward to hearing from you as you seek to cross the great generation divide and revillage your community.



  • 15 Jan 2019 3:35 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Sarah Gregory is the Communications Coordinator for CEF. She works from home in St. Louis as a freelance writer, musician, and consultant. She has an MACE from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. 



    Over the last century, the mainline institutional church, the presumed titan of Western morality, changed. The culture changed. Life expectancy, retirement, young adulthood, adolescence, and childhood changed. As a result, the landscape of faith formation work changed. But the practice of faith, the God who leads us, and the call to make disciples remains unchanged. 

    Amidst all the cultural and religious changes, the people of God hold tightly to the fact that God remains the same; loving, merciful, and just. Faith formation happens in unexpected places, arguably as it always has—from burning bushes to shepherd’s fields, God sanctifies holy ground where we least expect it. Certainly, if God remained faithful in First Century Paletine during enormous cultural shifts, the rise and fall of empires, and the birth of the Church, then God remains faithful now, even as church leaders in the United States navigate unexpected holy ground.

    The work is difficult. By God’s grace, the work does not have to be lonely. Over the next few months, CEF will feature some unexpected places and practices that fellow faith formation leaders are pursuing in an effort to create disciples in our current culture.

    Tell us your unconventional faith formation practices. Where are they happening? What do they look like? What do you dream about doing?

    Share a picture with us using our social media accounts with a small caption or comment below. Your experiences may spark others’ divinely inspired imaginations to do something new. Let’s ring in 2019 with a celebration of all the ways that God is incarnate today.

    Look to our social media pages for featured faith formation ideas. Find ideas on our blogs. Share your ideas, thoughts, and dreams. Be on the lookout for neighborhood mentoring opportunities, nook classrooms, and chances to connect with faith formation leaders like you. Together, we will continue to meet God in unexpected ways.


  • 14 Jan 2019 1:30 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Emily La Branche Delikat is a CEF Board Member and the Development Editor of Children’s Resources at the United Methodist Publishing House. She holds a M.A. in Christian Ministries with an emphasis in Christian Education from Asbury Theological Seminary. Emily has more than 10 years of experience in early childhood classrooms, and worked as a Director of Music, Director of Children’s Ministry, and Director of Spiritual Formation in UM churches. Emily is the author of Piggyback Psalms: 100+ Bible Songs to Tunes You Know, and writer and editor of Deep Blue Early Elementary and Deep Blue Kids Church. She is passionate about helping children and families fully participate in the life of the church through worship, education, and service.

    Psalm 139 reminds us that God is always with us, “Where shall I go from your Spirit? Or where shall I flee from your presence? If I ascend to heaven, you are there! If I make my bed in Sheol, you are there! If I take the wings of the morning and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me.” (CEB) Spiritual practices are everyday activities done with the intention of becoming aware of God’s presence with us and in us. They help bring us into a space physically, mentally, and emotionally where we are able to meet God and ourselves in new and familiar ways. Spiritual practices can be an important part of your ministry with children.

    You are likely already using spiritual practices in your children’s ministry. When you sing, pray, color, bless, wonder, worship, serve, and more, you are inviting children (and yourself) to become aware of God’s presence among them and within themselves. You may even have been incorporating activities that you didn't realize are spiritual practices. Take a moment to think about the ways that you are are inviting children to be with God.

    • Pull out a copy of a lesson plan that you have used for Sunday school, children’s worship, or other children’s ministry event. If you do not have one written down, take some time to write a quick outline of your most recent children’s event.

    • Circle or highlight the times when children are encouraged to recognize that God is with them and that they and others are children of God.

    • Make note of the things that you have circled or highlighted that have become regular rituals within your ministry. These are excellent examples of spiritual practices you are already doing.


    Want to include more intentional spiritual practices in your children’s ministry? Try some of these activities:

    • Greeting—Greet the children each time you begin an event or class together in a way that reminds them that God is present. You may want to use the greeting commonly used in worship, “The Lord be with you. And also with you.” Try greeting the children with a hand clapping chant or a song such as “This is the Day.” Including a greeting as an intentional spiritual practice helps children into a time focused on being with God and one another.

    • Silence—Include very short moments of intentional silence within your time together. To introduce the practice, try taking a short pause in your spoken prayers before concluding with, “Amen.”

    • Body Awareness—Have the children sit with their feet on the floor or lie down on their backs. Invite the children to become aware of their breathing. Encourage the children to breath in through their noses as you slowly count to four, and then breathe out through their mouths as you slowly count to four again. Do this several times. After a few repetitions, do the exercise again saying, “God is with us.” in the place of counting. This breathing exercise invites the children to be still and become aware of their bodies and God’s presence with them.

    • Lighting Candles—When we gather for worship we often light candles. The light reminds us that God is present with us in the worship time and space. Candles can be a reminder that God is with us in other times as well. Try adding a candle lighting to your routine at the beginning of your time together, before reading the Bible, or as a part of prayer. Real candles are ideal because you can feel, see, and smell them, but battery operated candles are also an option.

    • Coloring Scripture—Read a Bible verse or scripture passage together. Invite the children to illustrate or color what they heard. Encourage imagination.

    • Praying for One Another—Take time for each child, who desires to share, to tell the group about something that happened in his or her life recently, good or bad. Honor the child’s story and have the children say with you, “Thank you, God”; “God, please help.”; or “Lord, hear our prayer.”

    • Blessing—As each child leaves say a blessing for that child. Depending on the child and your context, you may wish to place your hand on the child’s shoulder, head, or hand. The blessing may be simple, such as, “God loves you.”; “You are a loved child of God.”; or “God be with you wherever you go.”


    Practicing being in God’s presence together at church gives children the tools and resources that will help them connect with God in new and deeper ways throughout their daily lives. As you incorporate spiritual practices into your ministry with children, you may find that the children will teach you some practices or even create their own.


    How have you incorporated spiritual practices in your children’s ministry? What new spiritual practices are you excited to try?










  • 12 Nov 2018 12:59 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Rev. Kathy Wadsley is a former CEF Board Member. She served most recently at St. Matthews UMC in Bowie, MD. We are thankful for this resource she has freely shared. If you would like to make a donation in her honor to continue to support CEF's efforts to make member-created resources like these available, please use the donate tab on this website.

    This three-year series of devotional calendars is available in both English and Spanish for both Lent and Advent. Great for all ages and families of all sizes. May be printed at home, or inserted into church newsletters or emails. Each day includes a suggested activity a symbol to color.

    Advent Calendar Year C English 18.pdf

    Calendario de Cuaresma Ano CAdventCalendarYearCSpanish18.pdf

    Intro and Printing Instructions

    Adviento y Cuaresma Calendarios Devocionales en Inglés y en Español - Intro e Imprimir

    These calendars are part of an ecumenical three-year series of Advent – Christmas and Lenten calendars based on the new common lectionary scriptures. The calendars, available in English and Spanish, are designed to encourage families and individuals to take a few moments each day to focus on the meaning of these special seasons of the church year. Each day of Advent through Epiphany or each day of Lent though Easter Sunday has a scripture reference from the new common lectionary or a related activity and a symbol which children of all ages may enjoy coloring. 

    Suggestions for use: 

    † For Families at home. 

    † Use in Sunday School as a class or weekday ministries to learn about the seasons and the symbols. 

    † Classes could draw their own symbols, write the meaning on it and make a large calendar on classroom wall or bulletin board. 

    † Color symbols with magic markers or colored pencils. 

    † Use as daily family or individual devotional. 

    †Distribute at Worship or Sunday School, in church newsletter or other ways. 

    Printing Instructions: The Advent Calendars are designed to be printed on legal (8.5” X 11”) paper and can be printed on ledger (11” X 17”) paper for larger print. The calendars are designed to be printed with calendar front on one side and calendar back on the other side using one sheet of paper. 

    Copyright These copyrighted calendars are designed by Kathryn (Kathy) L. Wadsley, Minister of Christian Education, The United Methodist Church. Churches have permission to copy and distribute the calendars for use. Calendars may only be freely given as a spiritual formation tool and may not be sold.


  • 30 Jul 2018 9:36 PM | Tim Gossett (Administrator)

    CEF is seeking an individual to fill a short-term role between now and the end of October to help us launch our new Neighborhoods and Nooks. The position will begin on or about September 1 and will last through October, with the possibility that the position will be continued for the long-term after that (depending on feedback at the CEF2018 conference).

    Click for a description of Neighborhoods and Nooks, as well as a general position description.

    Deadline for applying: August 15. Questions may be directed to Scott Hughes, barnesvilletheologian@hotmail.com.

  • 23 Jul 2018 11:11 AM | Tim Gossett (Administrator)

    CEF Call for Nominations

    The CEF Board is now taking nominations to elect 4 new Board members for the upcoming 2019-2022 term. 

    You are invited to nominate yourself or another qualified individual that would serve CEF faithfully in the following ways:

    • Board members serve a four year term, beginning January 1st. Those who can will also meet with the current Board members at CEF2018. Each member serves on one of the teams that make up the Board’s work (e.g. Neighborhoods, Nooks, finances, etc.) Board members work on team projects that serve to enable the work of CEF to live into its mission to develop leaders in faith formation to equip people of all ages to live as disciples of Jesus Christ.
    • Participate in monthly or bi-monthly conference calls
    • Participation at the bi-annual conference is strongly encouraged.
    • Board Members are encouraged to cover expenses as they can, such as travel to the annual board meeting, but it is not a requirement.
    • Participate in an annual onsite meeting in Nashville (approx. 3 days, near the end of January)

    Election Timeline

    Nominations accepted until the end of day (CST) on August 15, 2018

    Elections will begin as soon as possible after the deadline.

    Click here for the Nomination Form
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